Zenreach raises $30 million; Peter Thiel joins board

Zenreach raises $30 million; Peter Thiel joins board

If you’ve used free wi-fi in San Francisco, there’s a good chance you’ve used Zenreach and just don’t know it yet.

The company, until now, has flown largely under the radar, because they wanted to amp up their business quietly for competitive reasons. And they’re finally ready to announce themselves and their new $30 million Series B funding. (Their previous $20 million in funding was super hush-hush). They are also welcoming billionaire investor Peter Thiel to their board.

Everalbum rebrands and launches a Shutterfly competitor

Everalbum rebrands and launches a Shutterfly competitor

Everalbum is evolving its brand with a broader focus on how to help its users capture and relive their stored memories. The company now wants to be known as Ever and is launching a photo-book printing service to rival incumbents like Shutterfly.

“Our brand is about living fully, connecting with the people you love, and appreciating the moments you’ve shared,” the company wrote in a blog post. It emerged out of stealth last November as a blend of Google Photos, Storehouse, and Cluster, enabling users to back up photos from multiple sources, such as Instagram, Dropbox, Facebook, and Google+. And while it has already backed up more than 10 billion photos and videos, the company believes that its value extends beyond its mobile apps.

Everalbum Provides Super Easy Way To Organize Your Photos

Everalbum Provides Super Easy Way To Organize Your Photos

The era of smartphones allows you to take photos anytime, anywhere. But then it leads to thousands of unorganized photos, memory issues on your device and once you need to delete some of your captured memories, FOMO (fear of missing out) gets real.

Luckily, innovative companies like Everalbum is tackling this problem making your life easier by providing a super easy way to organize your photos.

I reached out and talked to Andrew Dudum, co-founder of Everalbum, one of the fastest growing mobile photo experiences, helping millions of people globally organize and rediscover billions of memories.

You Can Explain eBay's $50 Billion Turnaround One Crazy Story

You Can Explain eBay's $50 Billion Turnaround One Crazy Story

Back in the middle of the last decade, eBay, the massive auction site, was in trouble.

Between 2005 and 2007, its stock price was cut in half and its market cap shrank by $30 billion.

In October 2007, eBay admitted that Skype, a company it had acquired for $2.5 billion two years earlier, was actually worth less than half of that.

During the third quarter of 2007, eBay lost money for the first time as a public company.

Meanwhile, it was becoming clear that despite a massive early lead, eBay was going to miss out on China’s e-commerce boom. In the United States, Amazon was quickly becoming the "Everything Store," thanks to smarter branding and superior technology.